ISSUE 3 - MARCH 26/2024 - 2025

Arbitration a beacon of tactical resolution: India’s learning and trepidation’s

AUTHOR’S NAME – Abhimanyu Chhibber, Bachelors of Arts (Political Science and Government
Studies), Third Year.
INSTITUTION NAME – Kirori Mal College, University of Delhi, North Campus, New Delhi.

ABSTRACT:
The court is not a forgiving entity; it doesn’t hold values of personal gain and restoration at par with legal protocols. The judicial system is open waters, navigating one’s way in the pursuit of justice can be hostile considering the nature of the Indian legal procession. As observed, litigation has comparatively little scope for flexibility and even less room to accommodate a win-win dynamic. The court essentially is open waters which are indicative of the principle of adversary it upholds which simply put is not and can never be a win-win situation leading us to consider other possible methods of amicable delegation.

( Volume 2 Issue 2 – 2024 )( Publication Date 31/MAR/ 2024 )

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Globalization and Crime against Children (Special Reference with Juvenile Justice Act 2015.) 

AUTHOR’S NAME – Ekta Pandey, PhD Scholar. 

INSTITUTION NAME – Shri Ramswaroop Memorial University, Deva Road, Barabanki, Uttar Pradesh.

 ABSTRACT:

 The aim of this paper is to show the negative consequences of globalization via the internet, on student sexual abuse, and to provide an analysis of children’s rights and their shortcomings in the urban area. This paper studies the different laws on child abuse in our countries and some of the international and national organizations that support children’s rights. Law and Society both are interconnected institutions. Law is made for the Welfare, safeguard, and development of society therefore each and every citizen whether is child Young are old man is required to act within the parameters prescribed by the lawmakers for the society. Everybody has to act abide and obey the law of the land to maintain the accepted social, cultural, and legal desired acceptance. 

( Volume 2 Issue 3 – 2024 )( Publication Date 06/APRIL/ 2024 )

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Law as an instrument of social transformation with special reference to women 

AUTHOR’S NAME – khushi Sarkhedi, BA.LLB, Second Year.

 INSTITUTION NAME – AURO University, SURAT. 

 ABSTRACT:

The function of law as a catalyst for social transformation, particularly with regard to women’s empowerment stands out as a bright spot of hope and advancement in the landscape of India’s socioeconomic evolution. This research explores the complex relationship between women’s rights and legal frameworks, highlighting the critical role that law plays as a tool for the exact purpose of social change in Indian culture. Through an examination of historical backgrounds, seminal cases, and current issues, this research reveals the intricate connection between legal advocacy and the progress of gender equality. Every significant legislative development, such as the outlawing of antiquated customs along the lines of sati or vishakha regulations on sexual harassment in the workplace, represents a stride closer to gender justice. But even in the face of judicial and legislative interventions, gaps remain between law and social standards, highlighting the difficulty of bringing about long-lasting change…

( Volume 2 Issue 3 – 2024 )( Publication Date 06/APRIL/ 2024 )

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ANALYSING LEGAL REGIME AGAINST CUSTODIAL TORTURE AND ITS INSUFFICIENCY IN INDIA 

AUTHOR’S NAME – PRIYANKA. C, LLM, First Year, (Criminal law and Criminal Justice). 

INSTITUTION NAME – Tamil Nadu Dr. Ambedkar Law University, School of Excellence in Law, Perungudi, Chennai.

 ABSTRACT:

 India is a democratic country that ensures the fundamental rights of every citizen. Dignity and security are the two very foundations of the social contract theory. The state has the duty to protect the rights of its people. However, it is very saddening to acknowledge that there are certain persons who still have their rights violated without any legally acceptable grounds. They are called custodial prisoners. Custodial torture has become a common phenomenon.1 The constitution of India as well as many international conventions advocates against any kind of inhumane torture inflicted on the person in the custody. Such an instance forces us to think about what will happen to the system when those who are entrusted to uphold the very nature of democracy and the law become its own perpetrators.

( Volume 2 Issue 3 – 2024 )( Publication Date 07/APRIL/ 2024 )

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THE EARTH DOES NOT BELONG TO US: WE BELONG TO EARTH

 AUTHOR’S NAME – Mitali Gour, BALLB, First Year.

 INSTITUTION NAME – Christ Deemed to be University, Pune lavasa, Maharashtra.

 ABSTRACT:

 “संरक्षेद्दूषितो न स्याल्लोकः मानवजीवनम्। “Meaning to safeguard our own lives; let us not pollute the world.1 Starting with this very quote from the Atharvaveda which tends to state a connection between mother nature and us (humans), setting a very deep precedent for how we should be treating our fellow earthlings, I would like to start my article on our environmental issue in India.

( Volume 2 Issue 3 – 2024 )( Publication Date 08/APRIL/ 2024 )

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